Monthly Archives: September 2016

Romantic Spots For Romantic Couple

With a diverse range of heart-achingly beautiful landscapes, England can be an incredibly romantic destination offering many gorgeous backdrops for romantic couples to embrace and share a special moment.

With love in the air, there’s bound to be a kiss or two. So our writers grabbed their walking sticks and meandered through our metropolitan cities and ancient woodlands to discover the top 10 most romantic spots in England to kiss.

1. The Mill Bridge in Bourton-on-the-Water, Cotswold

A tranquil river spanned by picturesque low arched stone bridges drifts through Bourton-on-the-Water, a charming Cotswold village. Set in the village centre, the original Mill Bridge is still as beautiful and functional as it was when it was built over 360 years ago. Take a stroll over it and share a kiss against a backdrop of picture-book cottages to prove that your love will last forever too.

2. Champagne on the London Eye

If Cupid had a home, it would probably be the aptly named ‘Cupid’s Capsule’ on the London Eye. It’s designed for couples, so you and your loved one can drink in the spectacular views of London, as well as a bottle of Champagne, in your own private capsule. The ride lasts 30 minutes; how many kisses you think you can steal above London in that time?

The interesting one is cycle around the world

Want to quit your job and go travelling but too skint or scared to take the leap? Take inspiration from Annie Londonderry, the first woman to cycle around the world. Coralie Modschiedler recounts her stirring tale.

On the morning of 13 January 1895, an enthusiastic crowd, giddy with anticipation, lined the streets of Marseille to see the arrival of a brave, young American woman in her early twenties.

Dressed in a man’s riding suit and astride a man’s bicycle, she had braved bitter cold and snow to reach the south of France from Paris. But despite the hardship, there she was, in the flesh: the famous, audacious Annie Londonderry – the first woman to attempt to cycle around the world.

A loud cheer went up and people waved and shouted as the petite, dark-haired cyclist wheeled by with one foot – her other foot, wrapped in bandages, was propped on the handlebars. Marseille was the last leg of her French sojourn and had been the most perilous so far.

“One night I had an encounter with highwaymen near Lacone [about 50km north of Marseille],” Annie later wrote in the New York World.

“There were three men in the party, and all wore masks. They sprang at me from behind a clump of trees, and one of them grabbed my bicycle wheel, throwing me heavily.

“I carried a revolver in my pocket within easy reach, and when I stood up I had that revolver against the head of the man nearest me. He backed off but another seized me from behind and disarmed me. They rifled my pockets and found just three francs.

“My shoulder had been badly wrenched by my fall, and my ankle was sprained, but I was able to continue my journey.”

Maldives on vacation

As the Maldives opens its inhabited islands to tourism, Heidi Fuller-love island hops and meets locals in three remote destinations.

My coccyx squeals as the tatty speedboat bucks and thumps us over the waves to Maafushi in the Kaafu Atol. Used to this brutal form of transport, Mohammed lounges on the bench next to me humming a song dedicated to Al-Sultan Ghazi Muhammad Bodu Thakurufaanu, the sea captain who liberated The Maldives from Portuguese conquerors in 1573.

I’ve been to many exotic destinations, but often felt that they’d been over-hyped. The Maldives, however, are as good as in the brochures: beneath our boat the water shimmers clear as turquoise glass as we bump across the waves, past tiny islands set in the sparkling sea like green egg yolks surrounded by the blue-white waters of their coral lagoons. “Most people come here for the diving – it’s the best in the world,” says Mohammed, who I met whilst waiting in line to take this ferry to his island.

Although tourists began to visit the Maldives in 1973, travellers were only allowed to stay on the resort islands and the only Maldivians they encountered would be cleaning their rooms, or serving them dinner. Luckily, a few years ago, ex-President Nasheed authorised islanders to open guesthouses. Nowadays it’s possible to live like a local in the Maldives and pay money directly to the people who live here. Unlike ‘most people’ who make a beeline for the luxury resorts, I’ve come to the Maldives to visit some of the lesser known islands and meet locals like Mohammed.